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H100 Latina Giving Circle

Her campaign made national headlines, beginning when she beat the male incumbent in the primary, though she narrowly lost in the main election. That same year the Democrats also nominated two women, one Anglo and one Hispanic, for state office. Their candidate for secretary of state, Soledad Chávez de Chacón, won, becoming the first woman in the nation to win election for that office. The next year, New Mexican women formed an official state branch of the NWP and elected Nina Otero-Warren as state vice-chair. When the first chair stepped down, Otero-Warren took her place at Alice Paul’s request.

Against the background of Hillary Clinton’s defeat in the 2016 presidential race, it is hard to understand how one of the richest and most powerful countries in the world has never elected a woman to the White House. Other countries in the Western Hemisphere — Nicaragua, Panama, Chile, Argentina, Brazil and Costa Rica — have had women as presidents. Reflecting on the words of a Supreme Court justice and women’s path to political equality.

Disaggregating the white male premium and the Hispanic woman penalty for various subgroups of Hispanic women can help paint a fuller picture of wage gaps for Hispanic workers based on country of origin, immigration history, and education. This methodological approach demonstrates how white men and Hispanic women of different countries of origin are respectively advantaged and disadvantaged compared to other workers in the economy, while also facilitating a direct wage comparison between the two groups. The late date for Latina Equal Pay Day demonstrates the differential economic well-being faced by Latinas compared to white men in terms of earnings.

Among the foreign born, employment losses have been equally sharp for Hispanic and non-Hispanic workers, -19% for each group. Hispanics overall are relatively young and less likely to have graduated from college, two factors that put them at a higher risk of unemployment in economic downturns. Also, 44% of Hispanic immigrants in the workforce are estimated to have been unauthorized in 2016, which also likely made them more vulnerable to job cuts.

The second study18 found that prenatal exposure to the passage of a restrictive immigration law in Arizona coincided with lower birth weight among children born to Latina immigrant women but not among children born to US-born white, black, or https://fol.org.mx/sin-categoria/four-reasons-people-switch-from-the-competitor-to-dominican-republic-girls/. Furthermore, women pursuing college degrees are on average older than their male counterparts, and tend to go into lower-paying career fields at disproportionate rates. Women also hold an unequal share of the nation’s outstanding student-loan debt — two-thirds of the pie, according to the American Association of University Women — despite the fact that fewer women have college degrees. While women are attending college at a higher rate than men (56 percent of four-year-college enrollees were women in 2017), enrollment figures don’t match their share of student loan debt. In fact, the pay gap is widest among Latina women with a college education, and widens as higher levels of education are obtained.

Latinas with advanced degrees only make two-thirds of the salary of their white male counterparts on average, and a similar discrepancy exists for bachelor’s degree and high-school degree holders. Latinas without a high school degree make 27 percent less than white men with similar educational backgrounds.

And notably, nearly half of black women (48%) and Latinas (47%) report having been mistaken for administrative or custodial staff, an experience far less common for white (32%) and Asian-American (23%) women scientists. Another theory is that women are choosing to forgo careers in STEM to attain better work-family balance—rather than being pushed out by bias. Several new studies add to the growing body of evidence that documents the role of gender bias in driving women out of science careers. A 2014 study found that both men and women were twice as likely to hire a man for a job that required math. Participants were recruited directly by the promotora, who attended churches, health fairs and other community events to explain the importance of the study and to encourage participation.

Before developing the AMIGAS adaptation, we conducted 3 focus groups with ethnically and culturally diverse Latina women to explore the factors that increased their HIV risks. We collected ethnographic data on their beliefs related to gender and social norms and sexual communication, as well as their knowledge and misconceptions concerning HIV.

Additional estimates, specifically those for racial, ethnic and nativity groups in the Great Recession, are based on the analysis of CPS data by Pew Research Center. These estimates are adjusted to account for the effects of annual revisions to the CPS.

But some Latino women aren’t doing the rest of us any favors, with some popular stars contributing to exoticism. Suddenly, Latinas became a hot commodity and have the expectations of following the media’s image of a Latina.

  • In addition to finding that unexplained wage gap for Hispanic women is greater than the aggregation of the absolute ethnic and gender effects, we also identify particular groups of Hispanic women at an even greater disadvantage.
  • The researchers also tested samples from 140 pregnant women collected before the pandemic.
  • Researchers analyzed 1,293 women who gave birth between April and June at Pennsylvania Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, which combined represent 50 percent of live births during that time in Philadelphia.
  • The research team’s serological test utilized a SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain antigen and a modified ELISA protocol.

Information obtained from the focus groups, Latina HIV prevention workers, community representatives, and a review of the literature highlighted the importance of making the intervention culturally congruent. We used a published adaptation framework (ADAPT-ITT)20 to guide a systematic process of selecting and then adapting SiSTA, an HIV risk reduction intervention for young African American women that is widely disseminated with CDC support,21 for use with Latina women. Lessons learned through the cultural adaptation process by community agencies included the challenge—yet importance—of addressing the diverse languages, gender roles, and social norms prevalent among Latina women. We maintained the theoretical foundations of social cognitive theory,22 the theory of gender and power,23 and the core elements of the SiSTA intervention throughout the adaptation process from which AMIGAS emerged. Rooted in the coronavirus outbreak, job losses in the latest recession have been concentrated in sectors in which social distancing of workers is difficult or the option to telework is lacking.

Intimate partner sexual assault against women and associated victim substance use, suicidality, and risk factors for femicide. Bauer HM, Rodriguez MA, Perez-Stable EJ. Prevalence and determinants of intimate partner abuse among public hospital primary care patients. Adverse health conditions and health risk behaviors associated with intimate partner violence–United States. ‡IPV exposure included women who reported any IPV since age 18 according to the BRFSS or WEB questions. †Categories of abuse are not mutually exclusive; for example, women who are positive for BRFSS psychological abuse, may also have BRFSS physical abuse.

And while Latina women face significant health challenges, there have been a number of notable improvements. With over 20 years of industry experience with leading staffing vendors, Vanessa has held several high-level senior management positions. Vanessa experienced firsthand the cost and complexity of building a business from scratch.

Hazen AL, Connelly CD, Soriano FI, Landsverk JA. Intimate partner violence and psychological functioning in Latina women. Rodriguez MA, Heilemann MV, Fielder E, Ang A, Nevarez F, Mangione CM. Intimate partner violence, depression, and PTSD among pregnant Latina women.

Top Cancer Sites For Hispanics (2012

The H100 Latina Giving Circle is a part of The Hispanic 100 network that was founded in 1996. The Hispanic 100 is an organization of trailblazing Latina leaders in the Dallas/Fort Worth area whose contributions have shaped, influenced and transformed how Latinas are viewed in business, education, arts, health, politics and community leadership. The Hispanic 100 is a highly diverse network of Latinas with a 20-year history whose value proposition as a collective group is the strength of their experiences, their reach and their capacity to influence change. Hispanic women are nearly three times more likely than non-Hispanic white women to lack health insurance, and less likely to have an established primary care physician.

Session 3 used video testimonials by Latina women who were living with HIV to enhance participants’ awareness of HIV risk practices and to dispel common myths about HIV in the Latina community. The health educators also discussed the HIV risk reduction strategies of abstinence, consistent condom use, and having fewer male sexual partners. Session 4 explored how experiences such as immigration, deportation, and acculturation can affect HIV risk among Latina women.

Latinas are making significant strides in education, participation, health, and other areas, but there is a long way to go to fully close racial and ethnic disparities. New policies such as the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, and other proposed policies such as immigration reform can greatly improve the lives of Latina women and their families. For example, under the ACA, around 4.9 million Latinas are receiving expanded preventive service coverage, and an estimated 4.6 million Latinas will gain access to affordable or subsidized health insurance, which may help close some of the health disparities Latina women face.

Lucy Spalluto, MD, MPH, left, worked with Angelica Deaton, a community health worker, to engage Hispanic/Latina women in mammography screening services. Third, as noted above, we were not able to disaggregate births to Latina mothers by nativity status owing to data limitations. Foreign-born Latina women have a lower risk for preterm birth than their US-born counterparts.39 A decrease in the number of foreign-born women among Latina women giving birth immediately after the election could, therefore, have contributed to observed increases in preterm birth. If, however, compositional changes drove our results, we would expect a similar association between the election and male and female preterm births. Consistent with the literature reporting fetal sex differences in vulnerability to the maternal stress response,40 we found a greater response among male births.